How To Ensure Your Trade Show Graphics Compel The Crowd As Part Of Your Business Marketing Exhibits

When designing trade show displays for any business, there are several key considerations that come into play throughout the process. The size and ultimate final footprint of the trade show stands are important factors as they will dictate the space needed for setup as well as overall shape, fit and finish of the piece. Inside features for exhibits are also important. Items like shelving, cabinetry and counter spaces must be coordinated to ensure proper organization and storage at each event.Trade Show Graphics: Essential For Enticing Visitors To Stop By Your BoothWhile these facets are important to the overall success of trade show displays, there is one critical element that could potentially prove even more vital: trade show graphics. The images and photos of the finished booths are essentially the signage and outer exhibits projected at the wandering crowd. In a sea of diversions and distractions, it is ultimately a business’ graphics that can grab the attention of event attendees and compel them to stop and visit a particular booth.Things To Consider When Strategizing Your Company ImageryAs with any type of marketing image, the first thing a business should consider is the color scheme and eye-catching appeal of the picture. While some businesses may feel tempted to use internal resources when implementing imagery layout on their company exhibits, this is often a process best left to the experts. It’s important to remember that working with a reputable exhibit design team means that the sky is virtually the limit when it comes to placement and other features specific to the photos that will be used in your final trade show displays. Careful planning on your part can help you best leverage your design partner’s expertise and create a final product that successfully grabs the crowd’s wandering eye.First, strategize the most important internal components to display throughout the booth. Does your company have an updated logo and other company specific graphics such as motto, slogans and taglines? If so, these should absolutely be a part of your final design. Using brand imagery throughout the booth is a great way to get the crowd engaged enough to want to stop in for a closer look.Next, it’s time to brainstorm with your sales and marketing team to determine the images that best capture what your company is truly all about. Using current, internal photos is fine as long as the pictures have the appropriate properties for reproduction enlargement on the exhibit. If your organization does not currently have images worthy of your trade show displays, get some. Hiring a professional photographer to take product pictures is a great way to ensure you receive quality images with artistic flair that can be distributed visually throughout your booth. Most importantly, these photos will convey in a single image exactly what your company provides consumers and encourage visitors to learn more about your business at each event.

Natural Health Sciences

Natural health sciences have taken on a whole new dimension with the creation and expansion of the large assortment of healing arts schools and colleges available today. For example, students can invest time and tuition to achieve a Bachelor’s or Master’s Degree in Science in Nutrition. Natural health studies that are provided in these degree programs involve anatomy, physiology, whole foods, organic chemistry and biochemistry, food science, nutritional supplements and herbal medicine, physical fitness, and related natural health sciences. However, be prepared — most degree programs in these and other natural health sciences require prerequisite education from an accredited school or university; and may take up to four years to complete.If you choose to pursue an education in herbology, there are a number of degree programs in natural health sciences that cover this field of study as well. Currently, candidates can apply to a Bachelor of Science Degree program with a major in herbal sciences, and earn a solid educational foundation to become an herbal instructor, herbalist, wellness practitioner, herbal medicine researcher, or holistic health practitioner, among others. Common natural health sciences that are offered in this course of study include herbal sciences, anatomy, pathology, pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry and organic chemistry, microbiology, Materia Medica, herbal preparation and formulas, and more.


Home herbal gardeners, don’t dismay — there are a number of holistic workshops and seminars that offer natural health sciences and studies in home herbal remedies, organic gardening, iridology, and introductory classes in supplements, vitamins, and flower essences, among others.Some certificate and/or diploma programs in natural health sciences are also accessible. If you like working with people and enjoy the healing art of massage, there are numerous natural health programs that emphasis bodywork modalities like deep tissue massage, Swedish massage, sports massage, aromatherapy, hydrotherapy, and associated studies.Because natural health sciences reflect the growing demand for natural health care and complementary medicine in lieu of often invasive and risky conventional health treatments, now is the perfect time to enlist your energy and talents in the ever-expanding fields of the healing arts.


If you (or someone you know) are interested in learning more about these or other programs in natural health sciences, let professional training within fast-growing industries like massage therapy, naturopathy, acupuncture, oriental medicine, Reiki, and others get you started! Explore natural health sciences [http://school.holisticjunction.com/clickcount.php?id=6634739&goto=http://www.holisticjunction.com/search.cfm] and similar studies near you.Natural Health Sciences© Copyright 2008The CollegeBound NetworkAll Rights ReservedNOTICE: Article(s) may be republished free of charge to relevant websites, as long as Copyright and Author Resource Box are included; and ALL Hyperlinks REMAIN intact and active.

How to Choose the Right Accounting Audit Software for Your Business

Audit professional should take his time and review available software solutions solutions on the market. Comparison, research helps, but I what I would suggest is checking testimonial section of each software provider homepages. Check if there are big companies listed among clients, what sort of services they provide. That helps to understand if solution you are willing to buy is worth it.Another great strategy is before you decide what tools to buy, or should you purchase new version of your current software, go to LinkedIn. Yes it is professional social community, where business representatives communicate with each other, share their thoughts, opinions and ideas. But, have you heard how powerful are GROUPS there. Probably not, people are not usually sharing that. In Linked in groups you can find excellent professionals that may really help you with advice or feedback regarding software you are interested in or searching for. Simply find a group for accountants, auditors or network administrators and Post a question about what tools people are using or ask to give you a feedback on any specific audit software product. I bet, in the next 3 hours, you will receive the most professional recommendations that will help you to save your budget and decide the most functional software tools.


Another great way to get professional advice and recommendation is CPA forums. You probably heard about these communities, simply Google it and you ll find a lot of them in the first 10 search results. Usually they all have threads regarding audit software. Post a new thread asking for advice or follow the discussion. Usually these communities are small, but you will not find beginners there, it’s highly professional audience that is ready to help.


By following these simple rules you will not waste money and time on useless audit software that don’t have enough functionality to keep your work efficient.

What a Pharmacy Technician Does

What Does a Pharmacy Technician Do?I have been writing articles on why and how to become a pharmacy technician, but some recent feedback has made me realize I left out the obvious. What is it that pharmacy technicians do in a pharmacy? Most people figure they help the pharmacist enter prescriptions and count pills. This is true for an outpatient pharmacy, also called a retail pharmacy, but there are many roles for pharmacy technicians in healthcare. The rest of this article will list different types of pharmacy settings and the roles that pharmacy technicians have in these settings.Community/Retail Pharmacy:I have worked retail, and I prefer other settings; however, it is where a large percentage of pharmacy technician jobs are found. What a pharmacy technician can do is determined by the state they work via state laws and rules. In general, technicians cannot provide clinical information to patients or be the final check for prescriptions. In some states, technicians are allowed to provide information on over-the-counter (OTC) medication (ie, medications that do not require a prescription, such as, acetaminophen and ibuprofen). Pharmacy technician tasks include, but are not limited to:• Collecting patient information (insurance and personal information as needed)
• Entering and processing prescriptions in the computer system
• Filling and selling prescriptions
• Requesting refills from doctor offices for patients
• Compounding medications that are not commercially available
• Ordering medications
• Restocking shelves
• Answering the phone
• Working with insurance companies on approving payment for certain medications
• Maintaining the cash register and conducting accounting functionsHospital Pharmacy:There are many different roles for pharmacy technicians in a hospital pharmacy. I know this type of pharmacy best since this is where most of my work has been. The most common are technicians who work in the central pharmacy. In addition we have decentralized techs, sterile compounding techs, billing techs, OR techs, narcotic techs, database techs, automation techs, team lead techs, and buyer techs. These technicians as a whole perform the following tasks, but not limited to:


• Filling new orders, this includes a variety of medications from oral medications to specially prepared sterile compound medications (including chemotherapy meds)
• Answering the phone
• Tubing medications (if the pharmacy has a pneumatic tube station)
• Preparing medications for delivery
• Delivering medications
• Assisting floor pharmacists with medication histories
• Assisting floor pharmacists with IV drip checks
• Handling missing dose calls
• Billing medications where nurse charting does not bill
• Maintaining the pharmacy database
• Restocking operating rooms and anesthesia trays with appropriate medication
• Dispensing and tracking all controlled substances throughout the hospital
• Maintaining automation equipment [automated dispensing cabinets that store medication on nursing units, automatic fill systems (typically called Robot-Rx)]
• Purchasing of all medication and supplies needed in the pharmacy
• Leading and managing the technician workforce, including upkeep of schedulesLong-Term Care Pharmacy:I have worked at a couple of long-term care pharmacies, and I think it is a great place to be a technician. They typically employee a lot of techs because the work load lends itself to a lot of technician tasks. These pharmacies provide the medication needs for nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and psychiatric facilities. The typical pharmacy is located in a warehouse. It does not have an open pharmacy for people to come to; they receive orders by fax and deliver all medications via couriers or drivers to facilities. The oral medication is filled in blister packs (cards of 30 tabs that are used to provide a 1 month supply of medication), or some other mechanism that provide the facility with an extended amount of medication doses that can be safely and cleanly kept until doses are due. Pharmacy technician tasks include, but are not limited to:• Filling new and refill orders (different from hospital because of the number of doses provided)
• Processing new order and refills coming through the fax machine
• Order entry of prescriptions and printing of labels for fill techs
• Sterile compounding of medications (although there aren’t as many sterile compounded medications as a hospital, there are still enough that most long-term care pharmacies have a few techs specialize in sterile compounding
• Billing medications to homes
• Controlled substance dispensing and documentation
• Ordering medications and supplies
• Restocking medications that are returned that are still suitable for reuse.Home Infusion Pharmacy:These pharmacies primarily care for patients that require some form of IV or other non oral medication, and want to receive the therapy at home (hence the name home-infusion). I have also worked in a home-infusion pharmacy. As a tech I had a lot of experience in sterile compounding, and found my self in any position that needed a IV room tech. Pharmacy technician tasks include, but are not limited to:• Compounding sterile preparations in the clean room
• Preparing supplies associated with sterile medication administration for delivery
• Billing medications delivered to patients home
• Coordinating deliveries of medications with patients
• Entering orders in the pharmacy order entry systemNuclear Pharmacy:No, I have not worked in a nuclear pharmacy (I am sure you were staring to think I got around quite a bit, but I have been in pharmacy for about 17 years). I have some friends who work in a nuclear pharmacy. The hours are interesting; they usually come in at about 3 AM and work until about noon. These types of pharmacies make radioactive compounds and they need to be made in a way that when they are delivered to the hospital or clinic administering them, that the dose has degraded to a specific amount. Without going into too much detail, these medications have short half-lives. So they have to time the compounding of the product with the time it takes to deliver the medication and the time the patient is to receive the dose. The job pays well, but as you can imagine, there are not a ton of these positions available. Pharmacy technician tasks include, but are not limited to:


• Preparing radioactive products
• Cleaning and preparing sterile compounding areas
• Entering orders into the pharmacy system
• Coordinating dose due times with deliveries and preparation
• Billing products to hospital or clinicHealth Plans/HMO Pharmacy Group:I saved this one for last because it is a lot different. Most healthcare plans have a pharmacy department. They manage the pharmacy benefit of the health plan. I have worked with my companies health plan and have spent some time with the pharmacy department. Pharmacy technician tasks include, but are not limited to:• Answering phone calls and providing support for patients on the pharmacy benefit
• Reviewing prior authorization requests
• Providing support to physicians and drug companies for information requests
• Supporting the pharmacists in the department with database and projects as neededAs you can see, pharmacy technician roles can be very diverse. The best advice I can give you is to figure out what setting you would most like to work in and obtain some experiential hours in that setting. I have found that the type of pharmacy you train in is typically the type of pharmacy you end up working in.